“We shall be as a city upon a hill…”

I’m sick near to death with the predictable responses of the group of politicians who 1) claim mass killings are not who “we” are, 2) point to emotional instability of killers with the implication that killers would not kill if only we could get them therapeutic help, and 3) ask us to pray for victims and their families; none of these politicians acknowledge the underlying recipe for the toxic stew in which we Americans are immersed...

Why Helicopter Parents Get It Wrong – by Bebe Nicholson

Wikipedia defines a helicopter parent (also called a cosseting parent or simply a cosseter) as a parent who pays extremely close attention to a child’s or children’s experiences and problems, particularly at educational institutions. Paying close attention would be admirable if parents were insisting their children complete homework assignments, behave appropriately, and learn how to deal positively with failure and gracefully with success. But this isn’t what helicopter parents are doing. Instead, they’re insisting their children receive good grades without earning them and receive special accommodations without needing them.

Some People Call Me Maurice

The quality, nostalgic tone, and important social message are why I am reposting this post from another blog.

radical eyes for equity

I’m a joker, I’m a smoker
I’m a midnight toker

“The Joker,” Steve Miller Band

I’m mixing weed with wine

Walk It Back,” The National

The universe occasionally can be quite trippy.

Over coffee I was telling a friend about Don Nelson’s recent admission about what he has been doing lately: “I’ve been smoking some pot.”

Then, I realized the coffee shop was wafting over their music system Steve Miller Band’s “The Joker.” I sang quietly a bit of the lyrics because this song was ever-present during my adolescence spent in the 1970s.

“Man,” I said, joking a bit, “I should have been smoking pot when I was listening to this stuff in high school. I really wasted an opportunity.”

Here’s the irony: It was during high school that I switched to contact lenses from my glasses, but these were some heavy-duty hard lenses of the time. As a…

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Standardized Testing and the Emperor’s New Clothes

I suppose I was in the second grade when the fable was read to me, but even at that age, the fable made me aware that children can have great power if they are honest, and equally important, I was provided with the insight that adults, especially important and powerful adults, are willing to go along with something preposterous because they are afraid to be the “only one” to stand up for a truth—especially if they had been outspoken in supporting something very questionable.